Tag Archives: manufactured housing

Five Quick Tips To Attract the Right Buyer

attract-more-buyersSummertime is a great time to sell your home! Here are five quick and easy tips to freshen up your mobile home and increase its desirability.

1. Be Your Own “Drive-By”. When buyers are shopping for homes, frequently they will drive-by the home before they call to set up an appointment. What does your home look like from the street?

Try to view your home as a buyer would. Does it make you want to go inside and see the rest? Start by tidying up the landscaping, wash windows and exterior light fixtures. Use a critical eye to look at the other features of your home – does the deck need staining or power washing? Do the railings, shutters or window trim need paint? Are the gutters and skirting hanging straight? Don’t forget to look at your curtains and blinds – how they look from the outside makes an impression. Sometimes just a few simple things can really help the look of the home.

2. Clean out closets and pantries. Now is a great time to think about charitable donations. Clean out those closets and cupboards so buyers can see how much room the house has. Shoot for getting storage areas down to half full. If necessary, you might need to store some things elsewhere or take this opportunity to pare down your belongings to just what you really need. Think about what you really want to take with you when you move, that will help you decide what to keep, and what to pitch.

3. Paint shelves and cabinet doors. While you are cleaning out those spaces, now is the time to take a second look at places we frequently ignore – the tops of shelves and backs of doors. These areas frequently get scuffed and stained. A fresh coat of paint or some new shelf liner can do wonders in making them more appealing.

4. Replace window treatments. Window treatments are notorious for getting dusty. Curtains may just need washing. Some horizontal mini blinds can be cleaned, but sometimes it is easier to simply replace them. While you have your treatments down, look at your windowsills. This is another dirt-catcher that might need cleaning or a touch of paint. Don’t forget to also look at your screens and the window hardware.

5. Have everything ready to go? Consider an Open House! Open Houses are a great way to get more people to view your home. List your home on www.mhvillage.com and advertise your big event to the thousands of shoppers that are on our site every day. Make sure to print fliers from your listing so you have something to put in their hands. Statistics show that buyers who leave with something in hand are more likely to call than those who don’t.

If you need help listing your home on MHVIllage or advertising your Open House, let our customer service staff know. We are here to help and walk you through it!

 

Planned Communities’ Designed

The second installment in a two-part contribution to MHVillage by Equity Lifestyle Properties.

Stumping the Professionals

With so many advanced mathematical formulas and neat patterns for manufactured home communities, you’d think professional planners in other housing sectors could easily replicate a neighborhood design and get the same results.

They get close, Allan D. Wallis writes in his book “Wheel Estate”, but haven’t figured out how to create the strong neighborhood bonds and sense of community of a well-managed and thriving manufactured home community.

Planner Robert Bair, Jr., one of the authors of “Mobile Home Parks and Comprehensive Community Planning” , stated that mobile home communities might be the last genuine communities in America.

 

Manufactured home communities develop a close-knit neighborliness and camaraderie that is rarely witnessed in gated housing communities and planned suburbs. Simply put, residents in gated communities rarely talk to their neighbors. A third of homeowners say they haven’t met their closest neighbor and 20 percent don’t know their neighbor’s name.

Planners of the modern gated communities, with 4,000 square foot site-built homes, have been trying for decades to get the same results witnessed in manufactured home communities. They have mimicked a manufactured home community’s layout, offered the same amenities, and even used similar lot designs, but still have yet to figure how to foster the social interaction seen in a manufactured home communities.

Hillcrest community Clearwater, Fla.

Of course, community planners can only do so much.

The friendliness and neighborhood cohesiveness that forms so naturally within manufactured home communities says a lot about the people living in factory-built housing.

Popular Manufactured Home Community Designs

Community planners use formulas and algorithms to determine the layout of a manufactured home community. Lot size and home placement is especially important to create a thriving community. Experts have found a few home layouts that work well for manufactured home communities and most of us will recognize them.

Herringbone

The Herringbone design at Island Vista Estates in Fort Myers, Fla.

A community laid out in a herringbone design uses diagonal lots to create a cohesive community that maximizes land use. The herringbone is one of the most popular manufactured home community layouts in the U.S. but it isn’t in the top slot.

Perpendicular

The most common community design is the perpendicular layout. Homes are simply placed side by side. This allows for a front and back yard and allows one end of the home to face the road. The staggered perpendicular layout is similar but the homes are placed on opposite sides of the lots.

Zero-lot Line

The zero-lot line is used less often than herringbone or perpendicular layouts. This design places the home’s backdoor on the very edge of the lot to create a larger front yard, but only a walkway in the back. This design is great for communities that have awesome views such as a pond or beach.

Parallel

A parallel layout places the home’s front facing the road. This placement allows for large lots but requires the most acreage.

The Muramota Cluster

Muramoto Cluster

The Muramoto cluster design is unique. George Muramoto was a popular architect and consultant for manufactured home communities in the 1950s. He created a park design that places four homes within a cluster that share a single driveway. To the unknowing, the community may look scattered and unplanned, but every home is placed with intention. The pattern only reveals itself from above.

 

ELS writer Crystal Adkins has authored more than 500 articles about manufactured housing and has been featured on BobVila.com and USA Today.

Affordable Housing Update

National Nonprofit partners to expand efforts in Texas

Nonprofit organization Texas Community Builders, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Business and Community Lenders (BCL) of Texas, is demonstrating the potential of delivering affordable, energy-efficient housing in Texas’ rural communities with factory built housing through a partnership with Next Step Homes, LLC and Clayton Homes.

A model home in La Grange, Texas, will serve as an example of what is possible for teachers, first responders, families and individuals of moderate income levels, and more searching for higher value, lower cost homeownership opportunities to promote asset building.

Rosa Ríos Valdez, CEO of Texas Community Builders, said, “We are proud to work with our partners to offer a model for affordable, energy-efficient housing that will be replicable in communities across Texas.”

City officials, economic developers, and members of the public will be invited to an open house and tour of this model home to explore the future of sustainable housing. An open house for home buyers and the public will be held on Saturday, July 8, with a second event for developers, real estate professionals, and officials on Friday, July 21.

Please visit nextstephometour.eventbrite.com to RSVP for the July 21 event, or nextstepopenhouse.eventbrite.com to reserve a spot for the public event.

Pricing for 3 bedroom, 2 bath homes starts from $149,000, including the land. Homes are highly customizable with optional features and a choice of layouts, and are built on a permanent foundation to ENERGY STAR® standards. Homes will be available for purchase or order as early as August 2017.

“This is a great opportunity to show the benefits of factory-built home,” said Stacey Epperson, president and founder of Next Step. “Working with Texas Community Builders, we hope to provide sustainable homeownership opportunities for more hard working Texas families.”

 

Final Input Sought for Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac

fannie-mae-freddie-mac

The House Appropriations Committee’s Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government (FSGG) on June 30 passed language from the Preserving Access to Manufactured Housing Act as a part of its Fiscal Year 2018 Financial Services Appropriations bill.

Last month, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) issued a final request for input on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s associated proposal on Underserved Markets Plans within the “Duty to Serve” program.

Mel Watt, director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, speaks in Chicago on affordable housing finance initiatives. From left, Paul Mullings, Sr. VP of Single-Family Strategic Business Initiatives for Freddie Mac; Russ Cross, regional manager for community outreach with Wells Fargo, and Sandra Thompson, deputy director in the Division of Housing Mission and Goals for the Federal Housing Finance Agency.

FHFA, the regulator of Fannie and Freddie tasked with enforcing the “Duty to Serve” provision, issued a final implementation rule on Dec. 13, 2016 mandated by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008.  The statute requires the Enterprises to serve three specified underserved markets – manufactured housing, affordable housing preservation and rural housing in a safe and sound manner for residential properties that serve very low-, low- and moderate-income families.

The rule requires each Enterprise to adopt a three-year Underserved Markets Plan to fulfill this mandate.  FHFA requests public input on the proposed plans through its dedicated web page by July 10, 2017.

It is anticipated that implementation of “Duty to Serve” provisions will create more financing options for potential home buyers, which also would be a benefit for the housing sector, including the manufactured housing industry.

“I strongly encourage stakeholders to submit feedback on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s proposed ‘Duty to Serve Underserved Markets Plans,'” said FHFA Director Melvin L. Watt.  “FHFA will evaluate stakeholder input as part of our review process to ensure that the plans help the Enterprises meet their statutory obligations in a safe and sound manner.”

Each Enterprise will update their “Duty to Serve Underserved Markets Plan” after reviewing public input and FHFA feedback. Each Enterprise’s Duty to Serve Underserved Markets Plan must receive a non-objection from FHFA before becoming effective Jan. 1, 2018.

The objectives in the proposed and final plans may be subject to change based on factors including public input, FHFA comments, compliance with the Enterprises’ Charter Acts, safety and soundness considerations, and market or economic conditions.

Clayton Awards $250k to Industry Nonprofit

Clayton Homes, a Berkshire Hathaway company and one of the leading builders of manufactured, modular and site built homes, recently announced the donation of $250,000 to Next Step Network, a nonprofit that seeks to provide affordable housing solutions.

Clayton presents Next Step Network with a $250,000 donation to help provide affordable housing solutions. From left, Tom Hodges of Clayton Homes, and Stacey Epperson and Chris Nicely of Next Step.

“Clayton has been a loyal supporter of Next Step’s mission since the beginning,” said Stacey Epperson, president and CEO of Next Step. “By working collaboratively with our nonprofit members across the country, Clayton home centers and manufacturing facilities have helped expand affordable homeownership opportunities for families through the building of new, energy-efficient manufactured and modular homes.”

In order to support nonprofit housing work in communities across the country, $50,000 of Clayton Homes’ donation will be directly allocated by Next Step to their member organizations in the form of small grant funds, meant to provide additional resources to help them deliver Next Step’s Manufactured Housing Done Right® model.

As a nonprofit housing intermediary, Next Step brings together mission-driven housing organizations and industry leaders in factory-built housing to promote the use of manufactured and modular homes as an affordable housing solution. The fellowship with Next Step and Clayton spans more than a decade.

“We believe homeownership makes lives better,” said Kevin Clayton, CEO of Clayton Homes. “With the average new site built home in America now priced at $388,200, we think it is more important than ever to provide an affordable housing solution to hardworking families across the country.  Clayton is proud to support this effort through its ongoing efforts with Next Step.”

Clayton has served as a key ally for Next Step in the manufactured housing industry, providing experience and expertise for both Next Step and their nonprofit member organizations, manufacturing quality, ENERGY STAR® certified homes for Next Step homeowners, and contributing support and resources to help deliver on Next Step’s Manufactured Housing Done Right® model.

The Next Step Network is composed of 50 nonprofit member organizations, serving 29 states and the District of Columbia. Since 2013, Next Step member organizations have delivered 463 new ENERGY STAR® certified, factory-built homes to communities nationwide.

Is Your Home Priced to Sell?

Here are some factors to consider when pricing your home.

priced-to-sellThough we work in the advertisement world of our industry and do not directly sell homes, our communication with our home sellers, professionals and buyers, gives us a unique perspective when it comes to how sellers price their homes. This article will talk about a few trends we see when it comes to home owners who are listing their own home.

Now, we know nobody knows your home like you do. So it is not surprising that we see a lot of individuals home sellers over-pricing their home on our site.

This totally makes sense, considering you know the all of the upgrades and special features the home has to offer, plus if you are like most home owners, you have invested in your home quite a bit over the years and hope to regain some of those costs with the sale

 

These are all completely logical and rational reasons to list your home on the higher end of the price range. However, there are some risks that come with pricing too high.

Things you risk with a price that’s too high:

  1. A “Hard Pass”– Some buyers look on our site and from the search results will scroll right past homes that are simply outside of their budget. So, if you are pricing your home higher than you know it’s worth you risk them scrolling past and not seeing your advertisement.
  2. Quality Buyer Leads Missed: Similar to number 1. Let’s say a buyer receives your home in one of their search alerts and decides even though it might be priced higher than they are looking, they will see the details. Your buyer might take a look at your advertisement but if the price is not justified with your home listing then you risk them moving on.
  3. Buyer’s Appraisal; Lower than Selling Price- If a home buyer is getting financing for your home, their lender will need appraisal. If that number comes in substantially lower than the selling price you risk the buyer backing out before closing.
  4. Selling Other Homes: By pricing your home too high, the other homes in your area that are priced lower get the advantage. Knowing your market is important, since buyers can also research the selling prices for other homes in that area.

Pricing your home to sell is something that takes research and perspective.

So take some time to learn how to price your home correctly for your market.  If you are working with an industry professional, or real estate agent, they will be able to tell you what homes nearby are selling for, and where your home fits in. They should be able to guide you with their industry knowledge, which is a benefit to hiring a local professional who knows your area market.

If you are selling your home directly, then you might want to invest in a home appraisal or at the very least a Book Value. Not only can these options give you a number to start with, but a report or an appraisal is also something you can offer your buyer.  We currently have an NADA Book Value on our website. You can get just the value for the home for free with your home listing, or if you want the full report (which includes a market analysis report) you can purchase that option too. For home appraisal options, we recommend contacting Datacomp Appraisal. They have a few different appraisal and report options and can give you a quote for their service right over the phone!

The next step is how you advertise the home.

While you know your home, the buyers don’t have any of that experience with the space. They are seeing a price tag on your home and they have to be sold on why it’s worth that number.

If you are advertising on MHVillage, we not only let you list all of the amenities and features of the home, we also have a spot where you can enter a full description. This area of the listing is incredibly important to buyers. Plus it’s your chance to really describe the space and prove that your listing price is accurate. Last but not least, photos photos photos. They say a picture is worth a thousand words, so why not support your selling price with them too!

Hopefully this article can give you a little perspective from the buyers side of things as you continue the process of selling your home. If you have any questions about the services MHVillage offers, please give us a call or send us an email. Our customer service staff is happy to help!